Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted by Categories: Christian News And Events

Study Says Attending Church Worship Services Can Help You Live Longer

Elevate Christian Network :: News and Events

Study Says Attending Church Worship Services Can Help You Live Longer

According to Vanderbilt University studies, people that attend church services are less stressed and live longer. | Image credit: Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

(Nashville, TN) – According to Vanderbilt University professor Marino Bruce, “We found in our study that actually attending church is actually good for your health, particularly for those who are between the ages of 40 and 65.” Bruce is also an ordained Baptist minister.

Specifically, the study says those middle-aged adults who go to church, synagogues, mosques or other houses of worship reduce their mortality risk by 55%. The Plos One journal published the “Church Attendance, Allostatic Load and Mortality in Middle Aged Adults” study May 16, 2017.

Study by Professor and Minister Marino Bruce –  Vanderbilt University

Bruce, a social and behavioral scientist, is a primary author of the study along with Keith Norris, a professor at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. The study has nine other co-authors, too.

The researchers used publicly available data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which is collected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics, for the study. They filtered the data set, finding 5,449 participants of both sexes and all races.

See the full story here… usatoday.com

 

Vanderbilt University: Attending Worship Services Keeps You Alive Longer

Professor Marion Bruce – Vanderbilt University: People who attend services at a church, synagogue or mosque are less stressed and live longer, according to new research from Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN). The effects of attendance at worship services remained after education, poverty, health insurance and social support status were all taken into consideration, Bruce said. The study did not address the effects of frequency of worship.

 

See also: Christian News Headlines and Christian Music & Bookstore at Elevate Christian Network

 

 

 

 

About 

Cee Harmon is founder of Elevate Christian Network and Elevate Your Potential Magazine. He enjoys helping people improve the quality of their lives - spirit, soul, and body.
 
Connect with us on your favorite social media sites. Leave us a comment in the section below and tell us what you think.
 
Cee Harmon Google+ | Facebook | Twitter | Youtube Channel

Attending Worship Services Keeps You Alive Longer-New Research

NASHVILLE, Tenn. - People who attend services at a church, synagogue or mosque are less stressed and live longer, according to new research from Vanderbilt University.

“Middle-aged (ages 40 to 65) adults who attend church (or other house of worship) reduce their risk for mortality by 55 percent,” said Marino Bruce, associate director of the Center for Research on Men's Health at Vanderbilt and main author of the study with Keith Norris, professor of medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. There are nine other co-authors.

“Our findings support the overall hypothesis that increased religiosity -- as determined by attendance at worship services -- is associated with less stress and enhanced longevity,” Bruce said.

The study, Church Attendance, Allostatic Load and Mortality in Middle-Aged Adults, was published May 16 in PLOS ONE, a multidisciplinary open access journal, using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), collected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics. The data are available to the public.

Bruce and his colleagues analyzed subjects’ attendance at worship services, mortality and allostatic load. Allostatic load is a physiological measurement of factors including cardiovascular (blood pressure, cholesterol-high density lipoprotein ration and homocysteine), nutritional/inflammatory (albumin, C-reactive protein) and metabolic (waist-hip ratio, glycated hemoglobin) measures. The higher the allostatic load, the more stressed an individual was interpreted as being.

Of the 5,449 people of all races and both sexes who were surveyed, 64 percent were regular worshipers, Bruce said. Non-worshipers had significantly higher overall allostatic load scores and higher prevalence of high-risk values for three of the 10 markers of allostatic load than did church-goers and other worshipers.

The effects of attendance at worship services remained after education, poverty, health insurance and social support status were all taken into consideration, Bruce said. The study did not address the effects of frequency of worship.

“There’s been discourse about the relevance of church,” said Bruce, an ordained Baptist minister. “So if you’re a person who knows very little about the faith tradition of your family, you might want to give it a try.”

-VU-


Follow Vanderbilt on Twitter: https://twitter.com/vanderbiltu, on Instagram: http://instagram.com/vanderbiltu and on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vanderbilt.

See all Vanderbilt social media at http://social.vanderbilt.edu.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *